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iOS: Testing No Space Left Situation

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How do you test that your app handles “no space left on device” errors properly? There is a (boring) way to stuff up your device until it’s full and test that way. It’s not the most convenient way though, especially if you want to test faster on the iOS Simulator. Here’s my solution: mount a small RAM disk for the Applications directory in the simulator.

Xcode and AppleScript

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A few pieces of AppleScript automating project’s destination selection in Xcode. AFAIK, unfortunately there is no other way of controlling Xcode from outside, so we have to depend on the actual menu items of the interface.

Sending HTTP POST Request With Netcat

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I have a D-Link Wi-Fi router that sometimes loses the PPPoE connection and thus requires reconnect. The standard way is to go to the web interface, login, and press the button. But it’s a long way, especially on an android device. Wouldn’t it be much nicer and faster to simply run a script?

Neurobics

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I’ve recently discovered a new term: neurobics. Which is formed from of neurone (the basic cell in a human’s mind) and aerobics (physical exercises), and suggests mental exercises to keep your brain thinking and processing new information. This will keep it healthy in the long run.

Hiding CVV Code on a Bank Card

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I bet you have a plastic card or two from a bank. I mean, debit or credit cards like Visa or MasterCard. The vast majority of them (maybe, all?) have this CVV (aka CVC) code on the back side:

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Card_security_code)

It’s very important for internet payments. Knowing it proves you’re the owner of the card (in theory). In practice, you need to remember or store it in a secure place, and then conceal it from the card.

One way is to scratch it away. But here is a less damaging way that works pretty well from my experience: first, apply some white correction fluid; then, sketch it with a black permanent marker.

Whichever way you choose, make sure other people can’t detect it, at least with a quick look.

Это надо видеть | You Should See That

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Необычный пост сегодня.

Кто-то где-то кинул ссылку на этот чудесный youtube канал с восхитительными видео: https://www.youtube.com/user/kreosan. Чуваки из Луганска развлекаются как могут. Там есть взрывы, электричество, разные опыты, и, конечно же, комментарии. Это надо видеть!

An unusual post today, but I can’t help it. I stumbled upon a link to this amazing youtube channel with just wonderful videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/kreosan. The channel is in Russian, but you can at least watch the videos, and turn automatic English subtitles. A few guys from Eastern Ukraine have fun as they please. There are explosions, extreme experiments with electricity, and other cool things. You should see that!

CoreData: “Incomprehensible Archive” While Fetching Data

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Automated testing (unit/integration/functional testing) is a really great way to verify your app works as expected. Also, having confidence that your refactoring won’t break anything is totally cool too. I’ve been doing some tests with CoreData entities and stumbled on a weird exception when simply fetching them.

Jenkins, Xcode: “No Matching Provisioning Profile Found”

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If you have some kind of a script to build your Xcode project from command line (eg, on Jenkins), there is one of the many useful environment variables you can set to modify the build process: PROVISIONING_PROFILE (I couldn’t find any official documentation regarding this env var). It allows you to pick an exact provisioning profile to use with your ipa archive, if the autodetection doesn’t work for some reason. But you may stumble upon seemingly strange errors.

WWDC Announcement Monitoring Command

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So, you’ve read the post’s title. Yes, it’s a bit late to publish it now, but anyway it may be helpful next year. For those who don’t get it, WWDC is a prestigious Apple’s conference for developers.

This script turned out not to be particularly useful this year, as Apple decided to make a lottery for deciding who can have a right to buy a ticket ($1600). Previous years, you could get a ticket during some time after announcement. In 2013, the tickets sold out in about 70 seconds! That’s why you could use a script to monitor the announcement to be able to grab a ticket faster.